POV talk: 2nd person

There are many POVs with questions surrounding all of them. I want to break them all down and discuss the biggest concerns in different posts. Today, I'll talk about 2nd person POV. 2nd person 2nd person is one of my favorite POVs to read. When it's done well, it creates a powerful story. It addresses … Continue reading POV talk: 2nd person

POV talk: 1st person

There are many POVs with questions surrounding all of them. I want to break them all down and discuss the biggest concerns in different posts. Today, I'll talk about 1st person POV. 1st person 1st person is intimate between the reader and the main character (MC). You get front row seats through the MC's eyes. … Continue reading POV talk: 1st person

An important reminder for writers

You're not a writer after you sell a hundred copies. That mountain of rejections doesn't define you. You're not a writer once the world knows your name either. You're a writer if you write. Even if you don't write for a while, you're still a writer. You're not an aspiring writer. You are a writer. … Continue reading An important reminder for writers

6 things editors need to know from writers before editing

Editors are essential. It's important to communicate some information with them though when y’all first talk. Here are six things to keep in mind: Word count, not page count Knowing how many pages there are isn't as helpful as one might think. There is the general standard that every page is about 250 words. But … Continue reading 6 things editors need to know from writers before editing

Best way to show instead of tell

Showing instead of telling is difficult. Most of the time, it's hard to think of how to show something. I forgot who gave me this writing tip, but it's one of the best ones I know: show through action. Or, in other words, show through your character interacting with the world. Here's an example: It … Continue reading Best way to show instead of tell

Common writer mistakes #13

#13 — Dialogue tags vs action tags Dialogue tags can be tricky. But they're easy to understand after knowing the difference between them and actions tags. Dialogue tags show who's speaking and how they're speaking. These can include but are not limited to: BeggedExclaimedGrumbledSaidScreamedShriekedSnappedSneeredSqueakedWhisperedYelled Dialogue tags are formatted with a comma before the quotation, and … Continue reading Common writer mistakes #13

Fantasy and sci-fi tips from an award-winning editor

I attended a Reedsy Live where Jonathan Oliver gave some wonderful tips for fantasy and sci-fi writers that I'd like to share. Some of these tips are for all genres though. What's a word count for fantasy and sci-fi? For adult fantasy, he mentioned the range to be about 130,000 to 250,000 words. Sci-fi landed … Continue reading Fantasy and sci-fi tips from an award-winning editor

Query advice from literary agents

I attended a Zoom meeting with literary agents awhile back. They mentioned many good tips, and I'd like to share some of them. Here's a run down of what they said: What they wish writers knew Takes time to hear back. They can have up to 2,000 queries at one time, so it may take … Continue reading Query advice from literary agents

3 tips to spice up your dialogue

Dialogue is critical. It’s not necessary, but in stories where it’s present, it needs to flow and keep the story going. That can be hard though. Small talk keeps the story still. Sometimes dialogue can feel like an info dump. So, how do we keep it interesting? Goals Give every character a goal—usually a different … Continue reading 3 tips to spice up your dialogue

When to tell instead of show

We've all heard the saying show, don't tell. Even as I edit, I find instances where I need to point that out. However, telling does have a purpose. It's about how you use it. And perhaps understanding it more will help writers understand when and when not to use it. There are two main concepts … Continue reading When to tell instead of show